Responding To Distressing Events

Responding To Distressing Events

As we live our lives, we can have a good effect on the world and the people with whom we interact. We can be compassionate, achieve healthy goals and try to make our world a better place. The world also affects us, for good and for bad.

Many people experience events which can be psychologically distressing. People can respond to challenging experiences such as trauma, abuse, loss of loved ones with remarkable resiliency. However, some traumatic or stressful events we experience can have a lasting effect on us. These effects could include intense emotions such as depression or anxiety, and include unhealthy behaviors including aggressive conduct.

Help is available at Perspectives of Troy Counseling Centers when events experienced result in your life being significantly, negatively affected. Areas may include social, physical, occupational, academic or emotional. At times, people will talk with family and friends and find emotional support and understanding. Sometimes, though, people don’t have available social supports with whom they feel comfortable sharing these feelings with. Sometimes people prefer to go to therapy and address issues with a professional.

They say “stuff happens” in life. Life will “affect” you in positive and negative ways. When life “infects” you, you may be re-experiencing stressful events, unable to effectively live your life, have lingering anger, depressed mood or anxiety. It is then time to take action and heal. We are told at times to “buck-up” or “walk it off” in our response to distressing events. That isn’t always possible.

If you have an experience that significantly affects your life for the worse, you don’t have to walk alone. You don’t have to accept a lifestyle stuck in depression, consistently on edge with stress, constantly feeling anger or unable to make sense of your world. Love others as you love yourself. Sometimes loving yourself includes taking action to heal.

Charles Vermeulen, MS, LLP treats many areas of mental health in adults, adolescents and children at both the Troy and Novi sites.